Archive for Places to See

Sunnyvale Trailer Park

What visit to Nova Scotia would be complete without checking out Sunnyvale Trailer Park, the fictitious park used in the final three seasons of Trailer Park Boys? Unfortunately it looks like all the buildings have been torn down and taken away, and all that remains is part of a burned up mental hospital. Still, I think as a huge TPB fan it’s my duty to stop by with some pepperoni, chicken fingers, and maybe a cut off cola bottle drink stirred with a hockey stick.

I wonder if it’s closed off to the public?

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Wawa Goose

Thanks to Jim from the Durham Region MS Society, I’ve found another landmark to see along the way, the Wawa Goose! Hard to tell how big it is from looking at google maps or this picture, but it’s still something that the bikes will look great in front of.

Apparently Wawa is Ojibway for “Wild Goose,” and apparently there are two other giant geese in the town of Wawa, but seeking those out will depend on how much time we have to hunt. I wonder how close we will be able to get the bikes?

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Cabot Trail

This isn’t as much a place to see, as a place to ride and experience. From all accounts that I’ve read, it looks like Cabot Trail is a 300km trail running through the highlands of Nova Scotia’s Cape Bretton, a beautiful, scenic loop carved into the side of mountains that rise high above the waters of the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

This is off the route, but wow does that ever look like good riding!

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Parliament Hill

What trip across Canada would be complete without a visit to the nations capital and Parliament Hill? Quickly having a look at google images I’ve seen some people have managed to get their vehicles up onto the grounds to snap a photo… I wonder if this would be possible? Might have to obtain some kind of permit, etc? I’ll have to look into this. Anyway, let’s add it to the map…

Parliament Hill, colloquially known as The Hill, is an area of Crown land on the southern banks of the Ottawa River in downtownOttawa, Ontario. Its Gothic revival suite of buildings—the parliament buildings—serves as the home of the Parliament of Canada and contains a number of architectural elements of national symbolic importance. Parliament Hill attracts approximately 3 million visitors each year.

Originally the site of a military base in the 18th and early 19th centuries, development of the site into a governmental precinct began in 1859, after Bytown was chosen by Queen Victoria as the capital of the Province of Canada. Following a number of extensions to the parliament and departmental buildings and a fire in 1916 that destroyed the Centre Block, Parliament Hill took on its present form with the completion of the Peace Tower in 1927. Since 2002, an extensive $1 billion renovation and rehabilitation project has been underway throughout all of the precinct’s buildings; work is not expected to be complete until after 2020.

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Confederation Bridge

While looking at route planning, I saw that there was a bridge that connected Prince Edward Island to New Brunswick, and after a little searching I’ve found it to be called the Confederation Bridge.

The Confederation Bridge joins the eastern Canadian provinces of Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick, making travel throughout the Maritimes easy and convenient. The curved, 12.9 kilometre (8 mile) long bridge is the longest in the world crossing ice-covered water, and a decade after its construction, it endures as one of Canada’s top engineering achievements of the 20th century.

A friend of mine who’s been over it said it was pretty amazing. Not sure how much the toll is, but it doesn’t really matter. This bridge will be conquered.

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Bay of Fundy

The Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick is a place that I’ve heard of many times, but really had no idea what it was all about until now. Well, I still really don’t know what it’s all about, but it looks like an unreal place that must be seen.

There appear to be a plethora of sights and activities, most interestingly the high and low tides, which are 6 hours and 13 minutes apart from each other. Imagine the image above without the water and kayakers…

I’ve come across varying opinions of where the best places in the bay are, so if you have a personal account that you’d like to share, I’d love to hear it. It’s obviously a massive area, so I definitely need some guidance as to where to go and what to see.

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The Big Nickel

Apparently there is something called The Big Nickel in Sudbury, ON. The Big Nickel monument is Sudbury’s famous nine-metre high tribute to nickel and Sudbury’s significance as a world mining centre. First opened on July 27, 1964, it has been dismantled for refurbishing once, and has since been moved onto a plain pedestal with the original rocks being disposed of.

Might be something interesting to see?

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Terry Fox Monument

As I’ve been planning the route, I’ve come across a few interesting places that I’d like to stop off at along the way. I’ll be making additions to this list slowly, and will be filing them under the places to see category.

Anyway, the first place that I’m going to mention, not necessarily the first place that I’m going to stop off at will be the Terry Fox Monument in Thunder Bay, Ontario.

The monument isn’t far from where Terry Fox ended his 5,373 km run on August 31, 1980. I’m sure every Canadian is familiar with who Terry Fox is, but if you’re not, here is an excerpt from Wikipedia:

Terrance Stanley “Terry” Fox (July 28, 1958 – June 28, 1981) was a Canadian humanitarian, athlete, and cancer research activist. In 1980, with one leg having been amputated, he embarked on a cross-Canada run to raise money and awareness for cancer research. Although the spread of his cancer eventually forced him to end his quest after 143 days and 5,373 kilometres (3,339 mi), and ultimately cost him his life, his efforts resulted in a lasting, worldwide legacy. The annual Terry Fox Run, first held in 1981, has grown to involve millions of participants in over 60 countries and is now the world’s largest one-day fundraiser for cancer research; over C$500 million has been raised in his name.

The monument is located on the Trans Canada Highway, just east of Thunder Bay, ON. I will definitely be stopping at the Terry Fox Monument.

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